helen lin artwork

A recent work by junior Helen Lin.

Junior student candidates for a certificate in the Program in Visual Arts present an exhibition of their recent independent work. Exhibition and reception are free and open to the public.

April 19 – May 5, 2017
Gallery hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
James S. Hall ’34 Memorial Gallery
Butler College

Opening Reception
Wednesday, April 26
7:30 p.m.
James S. Hall ’34 Memorial Gallery

 

FEATURING WORK BY:

VISUAL ARTS STUDENTS
Sandra Carpenter
Gabrielle Chen
Gabriella Chu
MacLean Collins
Logan Dziak
Imani Ford
Gabrielle Gibbons
Gwyndolyn Goldfeder
Heather Grace
Mihika Kapoor
Anhar Karim
Paulina King
Eric Li
Helen Lin
Kathleen Ma
Angélica María Vielma
Mariah Wilson
Jonathan Zong
Rachel Schwartz

Map / Directions
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ARTISTS' STATEMENTS

Sandra Carpenter
Disability as a Metaphor
               

Sandy is a Molecular Biology major. Her experiences in a genetics lab working on rare diseases, primarily craniosynostosis and related syndromes, incited her interest in portraying children  with craniofacial anomalies. Moreover, she is passionate about disability, its marginalization in both society and portraiture, and the contentious future of eugenics in defining a new class of disability. She strives to reveal the miracle that is a healthy-functioning individual, compelling viewers to deliberate on the unfathomably complex processes that underlie their organism. Inspired by Susan Sontag’s 1978 essay Illness as Metaphor, Sandy hopes to dismantle prevailing stereotypes about disability to encourage true empathy, acceptance, and learning. This body of work was motivated by the patients and researchers at the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, and the artist expresses her gratitude for the sage counsel of her professors and advisors, particularly Eve Aschheim.
Gabrielle Chen
Gabrielle Chen is a Visual Arts major from Oklahoma with a youthful look and an old, cranky everything else. She spent 3.5 years studying animation and film in California before returning to Princeton this semester to Prove Them All Wrong/Right. She has winter asthma and Many Boring Opinions, both of which make guest appearances in her zine-based gallery show (secret theme: First Contact). Thanks to her dear family in OK and her dear friends in CA, and thanks also to everyone at Princeton who’s helped her feel welcome this time around. :^)
Gabriella Chu
Gabriella Chu is a Visual Arts major from Queens, New York who works primarily with digital photography and film. She is currently studying abroad in Hong Kong at Hong Kong University to get a better understanding of her cultural background. In this show, she’s divided the photos she’s taken abroad into different series to deliver a coherent experience, presenting themes of authority, home, loss, and alienation. She would like to thank Deana Lawson for her advice and Paulina King for helping install her work.
MacLean Collins
MacLean Collins is a Religion major from Hopewell, New Jersey. For this art show she decided to grapple with tensions between wisdom and emotion, two very powerful and at times conflicting internal forces. While she is more naturally inclined towards drawing and painting, with this show, MacLean wanted to explore the challenges and thrills of three-dimensionality. She would like to give a huge thank you to her ever-thoughtful and creative adviser, Martha Friedman.

 

Logan Dziak
Logan is a Visual Arts major from Columbus, Ohio. Being a former football player, Logan wished to investigate the ideas of masculinity with this body of work. Within his photos, he uses football equipment in order to introduce a sport with a masculine culture, but breaks down the male body into vulnerable, nude positions in order to juxtapose these two ideas.

 

Imani N. Ford
Imani is concentrating in African American Studies and receiving a certificate in Visual Arts. She was born and raised on the Southwest side of Chicago. Her work starts, first and foremost, with her body. Specifically, the amalgamation and tension between the internal and external. Her work also explores how language (specifically metaphors), notions of “commonsense,” and transparency affect the way in which her body is (mis) perceived. This body of work represents her meditations on the absurdity, circularity, authenticity, deception and more.

 

Gabrielle Gibbons
Gabrielle Gibbons is an Ecology and Evolutionary Biology major from Trinidad and Tobago. This work is a visual diary and part of her ongoing experimentation with different paint and printmaking mediums. She documents her nostalgia, anxiety, dejection and reactions to news from home using images of herself and loved ones to create portraits. She would like to thank Pam Lins, Deanna Lawson and Daniel Heyman and the junior visual arts family for all the advice and support. Thanks to Margie Carhart and Graham for helping me to transport and install my work.

 

Gwyndolyn Goldfeder
Gwyndolyn Goldfeder is an Anthropology Major from Rochester, New York. She is interested in a multitude of things from explorations of phenomenology to the everydayness of her iphone camera. In many ways her studies in Anthropology contextualize how she situates herself within her artwork, investigating the inner depths of her own psyche and cultural surroundings. The items she has chosen to highlight for this particular show are at the same time deeply personal while maintaining a degree of separation from what she would call “the conception of self.” She invites the viewer to ask themselves the questions she may or may not be asking herself. She would like to “give a shout out” to Martha Friedman, Pam Lins, Margie Carhart, and of course Orlando Murgado for providing guidance and for being “awesome.”

 

Heather Grace
Heather Grace is an Art History major from Palm Beach, Florida. Her current work explores themes of subjectivity, truth, fiction, and narrative in the quotidian, pairing conceptual poetry with iPhone photography and digital screen shots. Her project on display, Untitled (Pink Tape), is an extension of her junior book project, which as a deviation from painting, restages conceptions of abstraction within the realm of text and image relationships. Many thanks to Eve Aschheim, Kurt Kauper, and Shohini Rakhit.

 

Mihika Kapoor
Mihika Kapoor is a Computer Science Major from New York. In her work you can see explorations of light, space and color and even a little peak into her trip to Africa last summer. These push the boundaries between painting with sculpture and painting with photography, respectively. This past year, she founded a national conference, Designation, that connected excelling design-driven undergraduates from across the country with leading creative executives like the CMO of IBM North America, Design Partner at Google Ventures, VP of Design at Adobe, and Chairman and CEO of Fox Networks Group. Drawing off the “rule of thirds”, the conference served to empower design students via a focus on applications in 3 industries, namely Graphic Design in Media & Advertising, Product Design in Tech and Design Thinking in Business and Entrepreneurship.

 

Anhar Karim
Anhar Karim is a religion major from Germantown, Maryland. For his junior project in the visual arts certificate program, Anhar wanted bring the tension of the last election cycle to the film medium. His short film, The Activist, tells the story of two friends trying to negotiate their relationship and emotions on the night of the 2016 presidential results.

 

Paulina King
Paulina King is a visual art major focusing on sculpture and analog photography. Through her sculptural work, Paulina King explores the limits of material and the ability of material to produce emotional and visceral reaction. In this series, she plays with reflection, distortion, and the object’s relationship to the viewer’s body. Her ideas and growth have been fueled by Joe Scanlan, Martha Friedman, Jim Welling, and, of course, her incredible parents and sister.

 

Eric Li
Eric Li is a computer science major and visual art minor. He practices at the intersection of these two fields and is interested
in how together, they explore and reshape our digital and analog interfaces. He has explored how we interact with time, as well as the role probability plays in our lives. The work presented in this show discusses forms in transition, as well as how seemingly random shapes and paths turn out to be not so random. Together they explore the broader question of the role liminal and transitional spaces play in our lives. This work is shaped by many conversations with Alice Chung, Francesca Grassi, Orlando Murgado, David Reinfurt, Jeff Snyder, Kelly Tan, and Drew Wallace.

 

Helen Lin
Helen Lin, born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, is interested in exploring a world where the real and unreal coexist. She often makes work about dysfunctional relationships, guilt, and human curiosity for the natural world. Helen was born a heavy dreamer. She dreams every time she naps or goes to bed. At the age of 19, she fell in love with a pvc pipe and her life has changed ever since. Many thanks to her mom, Deana, Margie, and the whole community of supportive vis juniors.

 

Kathleen Ma
Kathleen Ma is from Beijing. She is named after her grandmother and a kind of climbing rose. Through her independent work this year, she has thought about structures, fragmentation, loss of collective memory & identity, and cultural dissonance. She wants to thank Fia Backstrom, Demetrius Oliver, Deana Lawson, Margie Carhart and the VIS community for the support, feedback and conversations.

 

Rachel Schwartz
Rachel Schwartz is a visual arts major and dance certificate student. She is interested in weaving between the gendered lines of art and craft, and works with patterns across many media including makeup, embroidery, nail polish, food and collage. Rachel is fascinated by alchemy and the material properties of memory and love. The creative contributions of her audience are essential to her art and she hopes those who interact with her exhibition feel this to be true. This project was inspired by the women who cultivated her creativity as a child: Marian Isaacs, Edie Posel, Patricia Hoffman and Judy Fiskin. Rachel thanks Susan Marshall for her guidance, Orlando Murgado for his advice, her family for their love, Anna Kolstad, Nina Chausow, Anna Kimmel, Ben Gaylord and Drew Wallace for their support on campus and the inhabitants of the 4th floor of 185 Nassau for welcoming her into the VIS community.

 

Angélica María Vielma
Angélica María Vielma is the oldest daughter of José Andrés and Juanita Guadalupe and is the third of their six children. She was raised in Pharr, Texas, a small town on the United States-Mexican border. Through her work, she seeks to explore ethnic and religious identity, color, and the personal on display. The installation Angélica has created for this show focuses on analog media, the cross between monument and memorial, and the so-called waste that evolving technology leaves behind. Angélica acknowledges that this work would not be possible without her beloved family, Tyler Bozeman, Nicolette D’Angelo, David Sahar, and Michele Zhou. She would like to extend a special thanks to Martha Friedman, Deanna Lawson, Orlando Murgado, Joe Scanlan, and Dean David Stirk.

 

Mariah Wilson
Mariah Wilson is a visual arts major with work situated in the mediums of film and photography and themes extending to African-American studies and comparative literature. She has a passion for television and film, and she is interested in helping to shift the politics of representation in front and behind the camera. Most of her work deals with the representation of blacks, particularly black women, in mainstream media. The work in this show “look me in the eyes and tell me you see me whole” and “i am afraid of becoming what they see” is a direct response to the anticipated release of the television series, Guerrilla. Although the show is set during the rise of the Black Power Movement in London, it fails to highlight the important role black women played in the movement’s development. Many thanks to her supportive parents and brother, Jim Welling, Jeff Whetstone, friends, and the wonderful vis art community.

 

Jonathan Zong
Jonathan Zong is the joint art practice of Drew Wallace and Jonathan Zong. Founded in 2016, Jonathan Zong operates out of studios in Princeton and Oxford. Drew Wallace is a student at Princeton University studying Computer Science and Visual Arts. Prior to joining Jonathan Zong, Drew snuck around the 4th floor studios at Princeton and scared all the kiddos. He enjoys playing video games. Jonathan Zong is a student at Princeton University studying Computer Science and Visual Arts. Prior to joining Jonathan Zong, Jonathan restored ships by replacing every single part over time. He enjoys playing video games.

Event Information

James S. Hall ’34 Memorial Gallery at Butler College

Free & open to public

Event Times

  • Wed, Apr 19, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Thu, Apr 20, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Fri, Apr 21, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Sat, Apr 22, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Sun, Apr 23, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Mon, Apr 24, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Tue, Apr 25, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Wed, Apr 26, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Thu, Apr 27, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Fri, Apr 28, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Sat, Apr 29, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Sun, Apr 30, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Mon, May 1, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Tue, May 2, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Wed, May 3, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Thu, May 4, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal
  • Fri, May 5, 2017 · 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Cal

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