princeton and slavery

Thumbnail for Princeton Atelier presents <em>Tune Every Heart: The Princeton &#038; Slavery Project in Song</em>

The Lewis Center for the Arts’ Princeton Atelier will present a staged reading of original musical theater works that are inspired by the history revealed through the Princeton & Slavery Project on Saturday, January 13 with performances at 1:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. in the Faculty Room of Nassau Hall on the Princeton campus. The event is free and open to the public but seating is limited and advance tickets are recommended.

The Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Theater in collaboration with the Arts Council of Princeton will present a performance of work created by Princeton students from Assistant Professor in Theater Brian Herrera’s fall course, “Autobiographical Storytelling: Princeton, Slavery, and Me.” In this performance students will use an array of storytelling modes to bring to life the historical materials unearthed by the Princeton & Slavery Project. The event will take place on Wednesday, December 13 at 7:00 p.m. at the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts at 102 Witherspoon Street in Princeton. The event is free, but reservations are encouraged.

Thumbnail for The Arts Council of Princeton presents &#8220;Princeton, Slavery, and Me: A Community Stage Event&#8221;

The Arts Council of Princeton presents the final presentation of Assistant Professor of Theater Brian Herrera’s "Autobiographical Storytelling: Princeton, Slavery, and Me” fall course offered through Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. The theater/creative writing course focuses on the stories we do (and don’t) tell about ourselves, as well as the stories we do (and don’t) tell about Princeton University. The workshop course engaged students directly with the historical materials unearthed by the "Princeton and Slavery Project” as they rehearsed the writing and performance skills necessary to remake the raw material drawn from lived experience into compelling autobiographical storytelling. Working in an array of storytelling modes, the students will share stories about how the history of slavery at Princeton University guides, informs, or challenges our ethical and moral understandings of the stories we choose to tell about ourselves. The final course presentation will be on Wednesday, December 13 at 7:00 p.m. in the Paul Robeson Center for the Arts at 102 Witherspoon Street, Princeton. The event is free and open to the public but advance registration is recommended.

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