Courses

Fall 2022 Courses

Atelier

Baby Wants Candy: Creating Comedy for Television

ATL 494 / CWR 494 / THR 494 · Fall 2022

C01 · Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Al Samuels · Scott Eckert

In this course, led by critically acclaimed comedy writer Albert Samuels, students will participate in the in-process television pitch used by Samuels' cutting-edge improvisation group, Baby Wants Candy, including finalizing concept and script and developing a strong pitch. Students will also work with and be mentored by guest artists and will develop their own original television concepts both in teams and individually, and also create shorter material - e.g., desk bits for late night shows, online content, etc.

How to Write a Musical

ATL 498 / MTD 498 · Fall 2022

C01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Greg Kotis · Mark Hollmann

Greg Kotis and Mark Hollmann, the Tony Award-winning writers of Urinetown The Musical, will lead a workshop in which students work in teams to write original 10-minute musicals. No experience necessary but each student will try their hand at writing book and lyrics and composing music and performing in the ten-minute musicals. We will study several points of craft including story structure, shaping material for an original musical, song structure, and the art of collaboration. Students will refine their understanding of these points throughout the practical work of writing the book, lyrics, and music of an original 10-minute musical.

Sex Variants

ATL 499 / GSS 499 / THR 499 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Jessica Mitrani · Steve Cosson

Theater writer/director Steve Cosson and multimedia artist Jessica Mitrani collaborate with students on a theatrical interrogation of the book "Sex Variants: A Study of Homosexual Patterns." The book features interviews with LGBTQ+ individuals in the 1930's. The class is a creative deep dive into these autobiographical accounts, manifesting strategies to adapt the text into performance, with close consideration of narrative; staging, acting/representation; design elements including video; music; etc., as well as how this historical material can be contextualized for the present. The class culminates in a collaborative workshop performance.

Creative Writing

Introduction to Art Making

LCA 101 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper · Mark Doten · Ruth Ochs · Shariffa Ali · Stacy Wolf · Olivier Tarpaga · Tess James

How do artists make art? How do we evaluate it? In this course, students of all levels get to experience firsthand the particular challenges and rewards of art making through practical engagement with five fields — creative writing, visual art, theater, dance, and music — under the guidance of professionals.

Poetry in the Political & Sexual Revolution of the 1960s & 70s

FRS 102 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Alex Dimitrov

What does artistic production look like during a time of cultural unrest? How did America’s poets help shape the political landscape of the American 60s and 70s, two decades that saw the rise of the Black Panthers, “Flower Power,” psychedelia, and Vietnam War protests? Through reading poetry, studying films like Easy Rider, and engaging with the music of the times (Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix, The Doors) we will think about art’s ability to move the cultural needle and not merely reflect the times but pose important questions about race, gender, class, sexuality, and identity at large.

How People Change: The Short Story and Life’s Transitions

FRS 147 · Fall 2022

S01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Sheila Kohler

In this seminar we will study moments of change at seven crucial stages in the life cycle (childhood, adolescence, courtship and marriage, work, maturity and death) in order to discover the conflicts and contradictions, the emotional truth, and the possibilities that such moments hold for us. Our medium will be the short story.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Wisdom of Crowds

FRS 169 · Fall 2022

S01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Susanna Moore

This seminar will study the history and nature of myths—traditional as well as urban myths—particularly in regard to the way that myths, legends, and superstitions reflect the concerns and fears of all cultures.

Introductory Fiction

CWR 203 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Aleksandar Hemon · Daphne Kalotay · Garth Greenwell · Idra Novey · Joyce Carol Oates · Yiyun Li

The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers a perspective on the place of literature among the liberal arts. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student's growth as both creator and reader of literature.

Literary Translation

CWR 205 / TRA 204 / COM 249 · Fall 2022

C01 · Wednesdays, 8:00-10:50 AM

Instructors: Paul Muldoon

Students will choose, early in the semester, one author to focus on in fiction, poetry, or drama, with the goal of arriving at a 20-25 page sample of the author's work. All work will be translated into English and discussed in a workshop format.

Graphic Design: Typography

VIS 215 / CWR 215 · Fall 2022

U01 · Mondays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: David Reinfurt

This studio course introduces students to graphic design with a particular emphasis on typography. Students learn typographic history through lectures that highlight major shifts in print technologies.

Advanced Poetry

CWR 301 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Michael Dickman · Patricia Smith

Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts.

Advanced Fiction

CWR 303 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Daphne Kalotay · A.M. Homes

Advanced practice in the original composition of fiction for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the place of literature among the liberal arts.

Advanced Literary Translation

CWR 305 / TRA 305 / COM 355 · Fall 2022

C01 · Wednesdays, 8:00-10:50 AM

Instructors: Paul Muldoon

Students will choose, early in the semester, one author to focus on in fiction, poetry, or drama, with the goal of arriving at a 20-25 page sample of the author's work. All work will be translated into English and discussed in a workshop format.

Words as Objects

VIS 321 / CWR 321 · Fall 2022

C01 · Thursdays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Joe Scanlan

This course will explore ways that language can take on material properties and how objects can have syntax and be “read.” Through studio assignments, readings, and discussions, students will investigate the idea of language as a tangible material that can be sliced, bent, inserted, reproduced, embedded, and scattered.

Advanced Screenwriting: Writing for Television

CWR 405 / VIS 405 · Fall 2022

C01 · Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Susanna Styron

This workshop class will introduce students to the fundamental elements of developing and writing a TV series in the current "golden age of television." Students will watch television pilots, read pilot episodes and engage in in-depth discussions about story, series engine, season arcs, character, structure, tone and dialogue, which will be applied to their work.

Introduction to Screenwriting: Adaptation

CWR 448 / VIS 448 · Fall 2022

C01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Instructors: Christina Lazaridi

This course will introduce students to screenwriting adaptation techniques, focusing primarily on the challenges of adapting “true stories” pulled from various non-fiction sources.

Baby Wants Candy: Creating Comedy for Television

ATL 494 / CWR 494 / THR 494 · Fall 2022

C01 · Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Al Samuels · Scott Eckert

In this course, led by critically acclaimed comedy writer Albert Samuels, students will participate in the in-process television pitch used by Samuels' cutting-edge improvisation group, Baby Wants Candy, including finalizing concept and script and developing a strong pitch. Students will also work with and be mentored by guest artists and will develop their own original television concepts both in teams and individually, and also create shorter material - e.g., desk bits for late night shows, online content, etc.

Dance

Introduction to Art Making

LCA 101 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper · Mark Doten · Ruth Ochs · Shariffa Ali · Stacy Wolf · Olivier Tarpaga · Tess James

How do artists make art? How do we evaluate it? In this course, students of all levels get to experience firsthand the particular challenges and rewards of art making through practical engagement with five fields — creative writing, visual art, theater, dance, and music — under the guidance of professionals.

Freshman Seminar: Stillness

FRS 195 · Fall 2022

S01 · Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:30-2:50 PM

Instructors: Aynsley Vandenbroucke

In a universe filled with movement, how and why and where might we find relative stillness? In this class we pause and reflect, develop tools to practice—and even value—a quieter approach to learning and work. We integrate an intellectual approach to the study of stillness with an embodied one, moving back and forth between learning about stillness across fields and then practicing it.

Introduction to Ballet

DAN 207 · Fall 2022

U01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 2:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Tina Fehlandt

From grand plié to grand jeté, Introduction to Ballet is for students with a curiosity for the study of classical ballet.

The American Experience and Dance Practices of the African Diaspora

DAN 211 / AAS 211 · Fall 2022

U01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Dyane Harvey-Salaam

A studio course introducing students to American dance aesthetics and practices, with a focus on how its evolution has been influenced by African American choreographers and dancers. An ongoing study of movement practices from traditional African dances and those of the African diaspora, touching on American jazz dance, modern dance, and American ballet.

Introduction to Dance Across Cultures

DAN 215 / GSS 215 / AMS 215 / ANT 355 · Fall 2022

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Judith Hamera

Bharatanatyam, butoh, hip hop, and salsa are some of the dances that will have us travel from temples and courtyards to clubs, streets, and stages around the world.

Stillness

DAN 221 / THR 222 · Fall 2022

U01 · Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:00-4:20 PM

Instructors: Aynsley Vandenbroucke

In a universe filled with movement, how and why and where might we find relative stillness? What are the unique aesthetic, political, and daily life possibilities while school as we know it is on pause? We’ll dance, sit, question, and create practices and projects. We’ll play with movement within stillness, stillness within movement, stillness in performance and in performers' minds. We’ll look at stillness as protest and power. We’ll wonder when stillness might be an abdication of responsibility. We'll read widely within religions, philosophy, performance, disability studies, social justice, visual art, sound (and silence).

Introduction to Radical Access: Disability Justice in the Arts

DAN 306 / GSS 367 / THR 367 · Fall 2022

U01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Christopher “Unpezverde” Núñez

Disability is front and center in a global social justice revolution. But who are the disabled artists and ideas behind this movement? How can we embrace Radical Accessibility and Care in our daily artistic practices? This course invites all artists, from choreographers to theater makers, film makers, visual artists, writers and composers to immerse in a highly collaborative, improvisational, experimental and inclusive community to explore Disability Justice as a framework for creative, dramaturgical and curatorial practices.

Princeton Dance Festival — Dance Performance Workshop: Repertory I *

DAN 319B · Fall 2022

U01 - Ronald K. Brown · Mondays and Wednesdays, 4:30 - 6:20 PM

Instructors: Staff

Technique and repertory course that focuses on developing technical expertise, expressive range, and stylistic clarity. In technique, students will examine concepts such as skeletal support, sequential movement, rhythm, and momentum to emphasize efficiency in motion.

Princeton Dance Festival — Dance Performance Workshop: Repertory II *

DAN 320B · Fall 2022

U01 - Davalois Fearon · Mondays and Wednesdays, 4:30-6:20 PM

Instructors: Staff

Technique and repertory course that focuses on developing technical expertise, expressive range, and stylistic clarity. In technique, students will examine concepts such as skeletal support, sequential movement, rhythm, and momentum to emphasize efficiency in motion.

Princeton Dance Festival — Choreography Workshop IV *

DAN 420A · Fall 2022

U01 · Fridays, 11:00 AM - 12:50 PM

Instructors: Rebecca Lazier

Students workshop their senior thesis projects either creating a choreographic production or enhancing their artistry as a performer. Classes workshop varying approaches to dance making, including examining practices from modern and post-modern dance, as well as diverse genres and cultural forms.

Lewis Center

Introduction to Art Making

LCA 101 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper · Mark Doten · Ruth Ochs · Shariffa Ali · Stacy Wolf · Olivier Tarpaga · Tess James

How do artists make art? How do we evaluate it? In this course, students of all levels get to experience firsthand the particular challenges and rewards of art making through practical engagement with five fields — creative writing, visual art, theater, dance, and music — under the guidance of professionals.

Music Theater

Introduction to Art Making

LCA 101 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper · Mark Doten · Ruth Ochs · Shariffa Ali · Stacy Wolf · Olivier Tarpaga · Tess James

How do artists make art? How do we evaluate it? In this course, students of all levels get to experience firsthand the particular challenges and rewards of art making through practical engagement with five fields — creative writing, visual art, theater, dance, and music — under the guidance of professionals.

Introduction to Theater Making

THR 101 / MTD 101 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Elena Araoz · Rhaisa Williams

Introduction to Theatre Making is a working laboratory, which gives students hands-on experience with theatre's fundamental building blocks - writing, design, acting, directing, and producing.

Shakespearean Hip Hop

MTD 232 / THR 232 · Fall 2022

U01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Chesney Snow

Was the Bard the original master of ceremony straight out of Stratford-upon-Avon? This performance laboratory explores the intersection of Shakespeare's language and plays with the culture, style, and artistry of Hip Hop. Students will use performance alongside an examination of the art, storytelling, and poetry of Hip Hop's greatest artists to develop a unique and immersive understanding of Shakespeare's greatest hits.

Actor-Musicianship

MTD 335 / THR 335 / MUS 303 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays, 7:30-10:20 PM

Instructors: John Doyle

This is a workshop based class for those interested in multi-skilled performance and in how performance skills can illuminate new forms of theatre making.

Musical Theatre and Fan Cultures

HUM 340 / MTD 340 / AMS 440 / SOC 376 · Fall 2022

S01 - Stacy Wolf + Elizabeth M. Armstrong · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Stacy Wolf

Why do people love Broadway musicals? This class examines the social forms co-created by performers and audiences, both during a performance and in the wider culture.

American Musical Theatre: History and Practice

MTD 348 / THR 348 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: John Doyle

This course will explore the history and practice of musical theatre. Starting with the American musical's roots in minstrelsy and burlesque, the class will continue with Show Boat, the musicals of Rodgers & Hammerstein, Stephen Sondheim, and contemporary shows.

Theatrical Design Studio

THR 400 / MTD 400 / VIS 400 · Fall 2022

C01 · Fridays, 12:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Lawrence Moten · Sarita Fellows · Tess James

This course offers an exploration of visual storytelling, combined with a grounding in the practical, communicative, collaborative and anti-racist skills necessary to create physical environments for live theater making. Students are mentored as designers, directors or creators (often in teams) on realized projects for the theater program season. Individualized class plans allow students to design for realized productions, to imagine physical environments for un-realized productions, or to explore contemporary visualization techniques, depending on their area of interest, experience and skill level.

How to Write a Musical

ATL 498 / MTD 498 · Fall 2022

C01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Greg Kotis · Mark Hollmann

Greg Kotis and Mark Hollmann, the Tony Award-winning writers of Urinetown The Musical, will lead a workshop in which students work in teams to write original 10-minute musicals. No experience necessary but each student will try their hand at writing book and lyrics and composing music and performing in the ten-minute musicals. We will study several points of craft including story structure, shaping material for an original musical, song structure, and the art of collaboration. Students will refine their understanding of these points throughout the practical work of writing the book, lyrics, and music of an original 10-minute musical.

Theater

Introduction to Theater Making

THR 101 / MTD 101 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Elena Araoz · Rhaisa Williams

Introduction to Theatre Making is a working laboratory, which gives students hands-on experience with theatre's fundamental building blocks - writing, design, acting, directing, and producing.

Introduction to Art Making

LCA 101 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper · Mark Doten · Ruth Ochs · Shariffa Ali · Stacy Wolf · Olivier Tarpaga · Tess James

How do artists make art? How do we evaluate it? In this course, students of all levels get to experience firsthand the particular challenges and rewards of art making through practical engagement with five fields — creative writing, visual art, theater, dance, and music — under the guidance of professionals.

Is Politics a Performance?

FRS 143 · Fall 2022

S01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Aaron Landsman

At a time when national politics seems frayed at best, local government meetings remain sites of direct democracy and creative protest. Is Politics a Performance? looks at how we perform in these meetings, and who gets to play which roles. Drawing on the tools of sociology, philosophy, civics and theater, we will analyze meetings in Princeton and Trenton, and class member hometowns. Through a layered, practical and fun approach to decision-making, citizenship and dramaturgy, this class is ideal for students considering work in public policy, education, social sciences and performing arts.

ACTING Against Oppression; Notes from the other America

FRS 187 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Vivia Font

Many Latin American countries have weathered many political and social traumas—dictatorships, coups, mass violence, political disruptions, and severe economic disparities. (Sound familiar?) In this mix of undesirable ingredients, theater artists reexamined and reimagined the use of theater to challenge and criticize structures, and to empower those who have been the most oppressed. We will learn about how different theatermakers from Latin America chose to tackle social/political theater from the ‘60s to the present.

Beginning Studies in Acting

THR 201 · Fall 2022

C01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM Thursdays, 1:30-3:20 PM

Instructors: Vivia Font

An introduction to the craft of acting. Emphasis will be placed on honesty, spontaneity, and establishing a personal connection with the substance of the material.

Introductory Playwriting

THR 205 · Fall 2022

C01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Sylvia Khoury

This is a workshop in the fundamentals of writing plays. Through writing prompts, exercises, study and reflection, students will be guided in the creation of original dramatic material. Attention will be given to character, structure, dramatic action, monologue, dialogue, language and behavior.

Storytelling with Technology for Performance

THR 210 / STC 210 · Fall 2022

C01 — David Bengali + LaJuné McMillian · Mondays, 12:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: David Bengali

Telling stories through performance is human nature, but how can we use technology to enhance, frame, or reveal new perspectives on stories told? Students will learn about tools and techniques from design professionals, and will engage directly and collaboratively with technology to design experiences focused around live performance. Areas covered may include projections and multimedia, lighting, interactivity, and programming for creative applications. This class hopes to bring together students with arts and STEM backgrounds, and does not require prior experience.

French Theater Workshop

FRE 211 / THR 211 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Florent Masse

FRE/THR 211 will offer students the opportunity to put their language skills in motion by exploring French theater and acting in French. The course will introduce students to acting techniques while allowing them to discover the richness of the French dramatic canon

Theater and the Plague

THR 220 / COM 246 / ENG 226 / GHP 320 · Fall 2022

S01 · Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Michael Cadden

Theater relies on the physical and emotional vulnerability of live bodies to experience the pity andterror that plague, war, systemic injustice, and more ordinary forms of disease and death inflict. As we face the twin pandemics of our own time, what can "plague drama" (prompted by outbreaks of typhus, bubonic plague, cholera, AIDS, etc.) tell us about how writers use literal and metaphorical diseases to give shape to a given cultural moment? We'll look at a wide variety mostly theatrical texts to explore how playwrights use the medium of the theater to literally embody and thus make visible physical, social, and metaphysical "dis-ease".

Stillness

DAN 221 / THR 222 · Fall 2022

U01 · Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:00-4:20 PM

Instructors: Aynsley Vandenbroucke

In a universe filled with movement, how and why and where might we find relative stillness? What are the unique aesthetic, political, and daily life possibilities while school as we know it is on pause? We’ll dance, sit, question, and create practices and projects. We’ll play with movement within stillness, stillness within movement, stillness in performance and in performers' minds. We’ll look at stillness as protest and power. We’ll wonder when stillness might be an abdication of responsibility. We'll read widely within religions, philosophy, performance, disability studies, social justice, visual art, sound (and silence).

Brujería is (not) Witchcraft: Religiosity, Power, and Performance in LatAm and Caribbean Imagination

LAS 228 / THR 233 / SPA 244 / REL 204 · Fall 2022

L01 · Mondays + Wednesdays, 1:30-2:50 PM

Instructors: Staff

This course explores Latin American and Caribbean culture and its connections with Europe and Africa through references to witches, witchcraft, and other forms of religion and power exercised by women, including practices from Santería, Palo Monte and other Afro-Caribbean religions. With a wide lens on how many women and queer bodies have been considered deviants, dangerous, and deemed punishable, this class will look at how colonialism and its aftermath shaped discourses around religion in the Americas, and how legal documents, visual arts, film, novels, and theater, have represented and contested those discourses and bodies.

Introduction to Irish Studies

ENG 228 / THR 228 · Fall 2022

S01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Fintan O'Toole

This interdisciplinary 200-level course offers a broad introduction to the study of Irish literature, history and culture.

Message in a Bottle

THR 231 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Maysoon Zayid

Messaging is an art and most people are bad at it. Maysoon is here to teach you how to effectively amplify your message using social media, written word, and public appearances as well as how to do damage control. Students will participate in panels, mock interviews, and will design their own podcast. They will develop a 7 minute talk on their message that will be performed in front of a live Princeton audience.

Shakespearean Hip Hop

MTD 232 / THR 232 · Fall 2022

U01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Chesney Snow

Was the Bard the original master of ceremony straight out of Stratford-upon-Avon? This performance laboratory explores the intersection of Shakespeare's language and plays with the culture, style, and artistry of Hip Hop. Students will use performance alongside an examination of the art, storytelling, and poetry of Hip Hop's greatest artists to develop a unique and immersive understanding of Shakespeare's greatest hits.

Introduction to Radical Access: Disability Justice in the Arts

DAN 306 / GSS 367 / THR 367 · Fall 2022

U01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Christopher “Unpezverde” Núñez

Disability is front and center in a global social justice revolution. But who are the disabled artists and ideas behind this movement? How can we embrace Radical Accessibility and Care in our daily artistic practices? This course invites all artists, from choreographers to theater makers, film makers, visual artists, writers and composers to immerse in a highly collaborative, improvisational, experimental and inclusive community to explore Disability Justice as a framework for creative, dramaturgical and curatorial practices.

Shakespeare: Toward Hamlet

ENG 320 / THR 310 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Bradin Cormack

The first half of Shakespeare's career, with a focus on the great comedies and histories of the 1590s, culminating in a study of Hamlet.

Actor-Musicianship

MTD 335 / THR 335 / MUS 303 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays, 7:30-10:20 PM

Instructors: John Doyle

This is a workshop based class for those interested in multi-skilled performance and in how performance skills can illuminate new forms of theatre making.

Casting: History, Theory, Practice

THR 339 / AMS 439 / GSS 349 · Fall 2022

S01 · Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Brian Herrera

This course surveys the history, theory and practice of casting within U.S. entertainment industries over the last 150 years to evince the creative, industrial and social features of the always-evolving casting apparatus.

American Musical Theatre: History and Practice

MTD 348 / THR 348 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: John Doyle

This course will explore the history and practice of musical theatre. Starting with the American musical's roots in minstrelsy and burlesque, the class will continue with Show Boat, the musicals of Rodgers & Hammerstein, Stephen Sondheim, and contemporary shows.

Black Dramatists in the English-Speaking World

ENG 354 / THR 351 / AAS 354 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays, 7:30-10:20 PM

Instructors: Nathan Davis

This course will survey plays written by Black playwrights in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will explore dramatic works of writers from Africa, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

The Plays and Films of Martin McDonagh

THR 359 / ENG 447 · Fall 2022

C01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 pm

Instructors: Fintan O'Toole

We explore McDonagh's extreme imagination, its roots in Irish Gothic, Grand Guignol, the Grimm Brothers, Antonin Artaud and the theatre of the absurd and its uncomfortable use of race and disability.

Race in French Theater

FRE 390 / THR 390 · Fall 2022

C01 · Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Florent Masse

Race in French Theater will investigate the question of race and diversity on the French stages. We will study efforts made in recent years to diversify representations both on stage and in the audience, and examine the concrete steps taken by major institutions, subsidized national theaters, festivals, drama schools, and commercial theaters. We will compare similar current undertakings in the world of dance and at the Paris Opera, and broaden the scope of our inquiries by looking at representation and inclusion in French cinema.

Films about the Theater

THR 391 / COM 391 / VIS 391 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Michael Cadden

Some of the best movies ever made focus on the how and why of theatermaking. This course will focus on five classics of Global Cinema that deploy filmic means to explore how theaters around the world have wrestled with artistic, existential, moral, cultural, and professional issues equally central to any serious consideration of moviemaking.

In Living Color: Performing the Black ’90s

THR 392 / AMS 350 / GSS 392 / AAS 347 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:30-2:50 PM

Instructors: Rhaisa Williams

From Cross Colours to boom boxes, the 1990s was loud and colorful. But alongside the fun, black people in the U.S. dealt with heightened criminalization and poverty codified through the War on Drugs, welfare reform, HIV/AIDS, and police brutality. We will study the various cultural productions of black performers and consumers as they navigated the social and political landscapes of the 1990s. We will examine works growing out of music, televisual media, fashion, and public policy, using theories from performance and cultural studies to understand the specificities of blackness, gender, class, and sexuality.

Theatrical Design Studio

THR 400 / MTD 400 / VIS 400 · Fall 2022

C01 · Fridays, 12:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Lawrence Moten · Sarita Fellows · Tess James

This course offers an exploration of visual storytelling, combined with a grounding in the practical, communicative, collaborative and anti-racist skills necessary to create physical environments for live theater making. Students are mentored as designers, directors or creators (often in teams) on realized projects for the theater program season. Individualized class plans allow students to design for realized productions, to imagine physical environments for un-realized productions, or to explore contemporary visualization techniques, depending on their area of interest, experience and skill level.

Baby Wants Candy: Creating Comedy for Television

ATL 494 / CWR 494 / THR 494 · Fall 2022

C01 · Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Al Samuels · Scott Eckert

In this course, led by critically acclaimed comedy writer Albert Samuels, students will participate in the in-process television pitch used by Samuels' cutting-edge improvisation group, Baby Wants Candy, including finalizing concept and script and developing a strong pitch. Students will also work with and be mentored by guest artists and will develop their own original television concepts both in teams and individually, and also create shorter material - e.g., desk bits for late night shows, online content, etc.

Sex Variants

ATL 499 / GSS 499 / THR 499 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Jessica Mitrani · Steve Cosson

Theater writer/director Steve Cosson and multimedia artist Jessica Mitrani collaborate with students on a theatrical interrogation of the book "Sex Variants: A Study of Homosexual Patterns." The book features interviews with LGBTQ+ individuals in the 1930's. The class is a creative deep dive into these autobiographical accounts, manifesting strategies to adapt the text into performance, with close consideration of narrative; staging, acting/representation; design elements including video; music; etc., as well as how this historical material can be contextualized for the present. The class culminates in a collaborative workshop performance.

Visual Arts

Introduction to Art Making

LCA 101 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper · Mark Doten · Ruth Ochs · Shariffa Ali · Stacy Wolf · Olivier Tarpaga · Tess James

How do artists make art? How do we evaluate it? In this course, students of all levels get to experience firsthand the particular challenges and rewards of art making through practical engagement with five fields — creative writing, visual art, theater, dance, and music — under the guidance of professionals.

Looking Lab: Experiments in Visual Thinking and Thinking about Visuals

ART 106 / VIS 106 / ENT 106 · Fall 2022

C01 - Lucy Partman · Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:00-4:20 PM

Instructors: Staff

It can be remarkably easy to take the process of looking for granted. Each day, humans contend with an onslaught of visual information. Education primarily focuses on teaching people how to read, write, and deal with numbers. But what about learning how to look closely and critically at images, at the world around us, and at ourselves? In this transdisciplinary course, we will question common assumptions and our own about looking; interrogate the anatomy and physiology of vision; develop our looking muscles; practice visual problem-solving strategies; and together design new tools to help people engage with the visual world.

dot dot dash — Exercises in Mark Making

FRS 124 · Fall 2022

S01 · Tuesdays, 7:30-10:20 PM

Instructors: MJ Daines

This course explores the fundamentals of drawing through process-based mark making on paper and fabric, building images through repetitive actions, line by line, color by color. A range of techniques such as hand and machine sewing, embroidery, and resist dyeing techniques such as stamping, stitching and batik will be explored to build a drawing vocabulary through accumulation.

Drawing Data

FRS 174 · Fall 2022

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Tim Szetela

Using an array of creative research methods, students will explore their environments, searching for data and identifying connective patterns, stories, and observations. They will collect and catalog their findings in evolving digital archives, iterating on modes of communication and techniques of design.

Drawing I

VIS 201 / ARC 201 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Lex Brown · Troy Michie

The great thing about drawing is you can do it anywhere! This course approaches drawing as a way of thinking and seeing. We'll introduce basic techniques while also encouraging experimentation, with a focus on both drawing from life and drawing as an expressive act.

Painting I

VIS 203 / ARC 327 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Colleen Asper · Pam Lins

An introduction to the materials and methods of painting, addressing form and light, color and its interaction, composition, scale, texture and gesture. Students will experiment with subject matter including still life, landscape, architecture, self-portraiture and abstraction, while painting from a variety of sources: life, sketches, maquettes, collages, photographs and imagination.

Analog Photography

VIS 211 · Fall 2022

C01 · Tuesdays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Jeff Whetstone

An introduction to the processes of photography through a series of problems directed toward lens projection, the handling of light-sensitive material, and camera operation.

Digital Photography

VIS 213 · Fall 2022

C01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Jeff Whetstone

This studio course introduces students to the aesthetic and theoretical implications of digital photography. Emphasis will be on gaining competency with digital equipment and editing techniques so that students can learn to express themselves and their ideas through the medium.

Graphic Design: Typography

VIS 215 / CWR 215 · Fall 2022

U01 · Mondays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: David Reinfurt

This studio course introduces students to graphic design with a particular emphasis on typography. Students learn typographic history through lectures that highlight major shifts in print technologies.

Graphic Design: Visual Form

VIS 216 · Fall 2022

U01 · Tuesdays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: David Reinfurt

This course introduces students to techniques for decoding and creating graphic messages in a variety of media, and delves into issues related to visual literacy through the hands-on making and analysis of graphic form.

Graphic Design: Image

VIS 218 · Fall 2022

U01 · Mondays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Laura Coombs

This studio course engages students in the decoding of and formal experimentation with the image as a two-dimensional surface. Through projects, readings, and discussions, students take a hands-on approach to making with an array of technologies (the camera, video camera, computer, solar printing, web publishing) and forms (billboard, symbol, screensaver, book) to address the most basic principles of design, such as visual metaphor, composition, sequence, hierarchy, and scale.

Digital Animation

VIS 220 · Fall 2022

S01 · Wednesdays, 12:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Tim Szetela

This studio production class will engage in a variety of timed-based composition, visualization, and storytelling techniques. Students will learn foundational methods of 2D animation, acquire a working knowledge of digital animation software and technology, and explore the connective space between sound, image, and motion possible in animated film.

Sculpture I

VIS 221 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Joe Scanlan · Martha Friedman

This class will be a studio introduction to sculpture, with particular emphasis on the study of how form, space, and a wide variety of materials and processes influence the visual properties of sculpture and the making of meaning.

Fabric Logics: Textiles as Sculpture

VIS 229 · Fall 2022

U01 · Tuesdays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: MJ Daines

This class experiments with 3D fabric construction, weaving, knitting, knotting and more as a means for making sculpture.

Documentary Filmmaking I

VIS 263 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Bent-Jorgen Perlmutt

In the real world, what relationships have the necessary friction to generate compelling films? Documentary Filmmaking I will introduce you to the art, craft and theory behind attempts to answer this question. Through productions, readings, screenings, and discussions, you'll take your first steps into the world of non-fiction filmmaking. You will analyze documentary filmmaking as an aesthetic practice and a means of social discourse. Further, as films are often vessels for their directors, preoccupations, the course will push you to examine the formal, social and political concerns that animate your life during these turbulent times.

Narrative Filmmaking I

VIS 265 · Fall 2022

L01 · Wednesdays, 7:30-9:40 PM and Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Moon Molson

An introduction to narrative and avant-garde narrative film production through the creation of hands-on digital video exercises, short film screenings, critical readings, and group critiques.

Intermediate Photography

VIS 313 · Fall 2022

C01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: James Welling

This course will examine photography's constant negotiation of evolving technologies. Students shoot black and white and color film and scan and print it digitally to broaden their photographic strategies, their technical skills, and their understanding of the medium of photography. A range of tools will be introduced, including analogue film development, scanning negatives, Photoshop processing, and inkjet printing.

Inventing Photography: History, Alchemy, and Practice

VIS 314 · Fall 2022

U01 - Anne Eder Chansonette · Fridays, 12:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Staff

This course is a history of photography tied to practice and designed to provide a deeper understanding of the medium's historic timeline through engagement with physical processes.

Words as Objects

VIS 321 / CWR 321 · Fall 2022

C01 · Thursdays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Joe Scanlan

This course will explore ways that language can take on material properties and how objects can have syntax and be “read.” Through studio assignments, readings, and discussions, students will investigate the idea of language as a tangible material that can be sliced, bent, inserted, reproduced, embedded, and scattered.

Ceramic Sculpture

VIS 331 · Fall 2022

U01 — Jennie Jieun Lee · Fridays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Staff

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning the fundamentals of working with clay. A wide variety of hand-building will be taught, enabling students to make utilitarian vessels as well as sculptural forms.

Photography of Violence and the Violence of Photography

ART 338 / VIS 338 · Fall 2022

C01 - Katherine A. Bussard · Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Staff

Photography and violence have been entwined for as long as there have been photos. These images pose questions about the past and present: What are the ethics of global representations of war, so-called natural disasters, and other atrocities? How have violent pictures particularly shaped US culture? What does it mean to bear witness through photographs? Grounded in visual analysis of complex and disturbing images such as photographs of enslaved people and photographs of victims of the Holocaust, this class will engage in rigorous conversations about the meaning, circulation, and power of photos.

Art Archives in Latin America

LAS 339 / VIS 329 / ART 336 · Fall 2022

L01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:00-4:20 PM

Instructors: Staff

This course, taught by Visiting Fellow Agustin Diez Fischer, aims to help students elaborate a critical and historical perspective on transformations, taking Latin American art as its case of study. This course is developed for students interested in the Latin American region including those focusing on art history, literature, politics, and students from additional fields interested in pursuing comparative perspectives to conduct their research.

Narrative Filmmaking II

VIS 365 · Fall 2022

L01 · Wednesdays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Moon Molson

An intermediate exploration of narrative and avant-garde narrative film production through the creation of hands-on digital video exercises, short film screenings, critical readings, and group critiques.

The Hidden History of Hollywood – Research Film Studio

CHV 385 / VIS 385 / AAS 385 · Fall 2022

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Staff

This course surveys a hidden canon of Afro-American film while also uncovers the roots of representational injustice in Hollywood and the secret, but cardinal role Woodrow Wilson played in the production and distribution of Griffith's "The Birth of a Nation" that led to the rebirth of the KKK. Wilson's policy of segregation was adapted by Hollywood as a self-censoring industry regulation of representation. Black people could only appear on screen as subservient and marginal characters, never as equals, partners or leaders. This industry code, Wilson's legacy, has become second nature to Hollywood.

Films about the Theater

THR 391 / COM 391 / VIS 391 · Fall 2022

S01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Michael Cadden

Some of the best movies ever made focus on the how and why of theatermaking. This course will focus on five classics of Global Cinema that deploy filmic means to explore how theaters around the world have wrestled with artistic, existential, moral, cultural, and professional issues equally central to any serious consideration of moviemaking.

Artist and Studio

VIS 392 / ART 392 · Fall 2022

C01 · Tuesdays, 7:30 - 10:20 PM

Instructors: Martha Friedman

The course addresses current issues in painting, drawing, sculpture, film, video, photography, performance and installation. It includes readings and discussions of current contemporary art topics, a visiting artist lecture series, critiques of students' work, and an artist book project.

Theatrical Design Studio

THR 400 / MTD 400 / VIS 400 · Fall 2022

C01 · Fridays, 12:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Lawrence Moten · Sarita Fellows · Tess James

This course offers an exploration of visual storytelling, combined with a grounding in the practical, communicative, collaborative and anti-racist skills necessary to create physical environments for live theater making. Students are mentored as designers, directors or creators (often in teams) on realized projects for the theater program season. Individualized class plans allow students to design for realized productions, to imagine physical environments for un-realized productions, or to explore contemporary visualization techniques, depending on their area of interest, experience and skill level.

Advanced Screenwriting: Writing for Television

CWR 405 / VIS 405 · Fall 2022

C01 · Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Susanna Styron

This workshop class will introduce students to the fundamental elements of developing and writing a TV series in the current "golden age of television." Students will watch television pilots, read pilot episodes and engage in in-depth discussions about story, series engine, season arcs, character, structure, tone and dialogue, which will be applied to their work.

Drawing II

VIS 407 · Fall 2022

U01 · Wednesdays, 12:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Troy Michie

This course focuses on the development of various approaches in observational drawing from the human figure.

Exhibition Issues and Methods

VIS 416 · Fall 2022

S01 · Tuesdays, 7:30 - 10:20 PM

Instructors: Pam Lins

The structure of Senior Issues and Exhibition Methods is to create a conversation and vision for, and in regards to and around your Senior Thesis. The nature of the class is somewhat informal and conversational, with the majority of class time being for student studio presentations and visiting artists lectures. There are two projects; a proposition presentation and a “handmade” poster project which will be virtual this year.

Counterworlds: Innovation and Rupture in Communities of Artistic Practice

HUM 434 / VIS 434 / ECS 434 / ART 404 · Fall 2022

S01 · Thursdays, 7:30-10:20 PM

Instructors: Staff

Co-taught with Brigid Doherty and renowned artist Josephine Meckseper, this seminar will explore the dynamics of creative collaboration through case studies of utopian communities of artistic practice in 20-c. Europe and the US (Worpswede, Bauhaus, Black Mountain) and the architecture of modern cities planned and imagined.

Introduction to Screenwriting: Adaptation

CWR 448 / VIS 448 · Fall 2022

C01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Instructors: Christina Lazaridi

This course will introduce students to screenwriting adaptation techniques, focusing primarily on the challenges of adapting “true stories” pulled from various non-fiction sources.

Music

Introduction to Art Making

LCA 101 · Fall 2022

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper · Mark Doten · Ruth Ochs · Shariffa Ali · Stacy Wolf · Olivier Tarpaga · Tess James

How do artists make art? How do we evaluate it? In this course, students of all levels get to experience firsthand the particular challenges and rewards of art making through practical engagement with five fields — creative writing, visual art, theater, dance, and music — under the guidance of professionals.