Courses

Spring 2021 Courses

Atelier

Darkness and Light: Writing, Lighting, Blackness and Whiteness

ATL 494 / THR 494 · Spring 2021

C01 · Fridays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Branden Jacobs-Jenkins · Jane Cox

How do you connect your verbal and your visual brain? This course will be a series of provocations to making art. Black playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins and White lighting designer Jane Cox will lead the group in connected investigations in writing and lighting as well as intertwined historic and aesthetic notions of Whiteness and Blackness. We will focus our imagination on theatrical and poetic connotations of dark and light as well as the production and philosophies of light. Classes will consist of discussions and creative exercises, and we will work towards a showing of creative projects at the end of the semester.

Art and Change in the Panopticon

ATL 495 / THR 495 · Spring 2021

C01 — Christine Jones + Gabriel Kahane · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Christine Jones

How might our obsession with convenience constrict our humanity? Is it possible to critique and dismantle systems of oppression from within? How do we reconcile the artist's need to enter into the experience of the Other with the need to be aware of structural inequities and the asymmetrical distribution of power? Join Christine Jones and Gabriel Kahane for a semester-long exploration of how we may aspire to change the world through art-making in a moment widely described as dystopian.

How to Write a Song

ATL 496 / CWR 496 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Bridget Kearney · Paul Muldoon

Taught by Bridget Kearney (Lake Street Dive) and Paul Muldoon (Rogue Oliphant) with class visits from guest singer/songwriters and music critics, this course is an introduction to the art of writing words for music, an art at the core of our literary tradition from the Beowulf poet through Lord Byron and Bessie Smith to Bob Dylan and the Notorious B.I.G. Composers, writers and performers will have the opportunity to work in small songwriting teams to respond to such emotionally charged themes as Gratitude, Loss, Protest, Desire, Joyousness, Remorse, and Defiance.

Visualizing the Battle Cry

ATL 497 / AAS 497 / VIS 497 · Spring 2021

C01 · Fridays, 7:30-10:20 PM

Instructors: Imani Perry · Mario Moore

Inspired by the experience of Black Civil War soldiers, the visual aesthetics of 19th century posters, and contemporary hip-hop, the award-winning writer and historian Imani Perry and the visual artist Mario Moore will collaborate on a groundbreaking new project. Using hip-hop to reimagine the soundscape of battle in the mid-1800s, Moore and Perry will negotiate both the historical record and the idea of what might have been. Students will work alongside Moore and Perry in drawing on language, visual prints and audio to make connections between the 19th century and our own revolutionary moment.

Creative Writing

Poetry in the Political & Sexual Revolution of the 1960s & 70s

FRS 102 · Spring 2021

FRS 102 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Alex Dimitrov

What does artistic production look like during a time of cultural unrest? How did America’s poets help shape the political landscape of the American 60s and 70s, two decades that saw the rise of the Black Panthers, “Flower Power,” psychedelia, and Vietnam War protests? Through reading poetry, studying films like Easy Rider, and engaging with the music of the times (Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix, The Doors) we will think about art’s ability to move the cultural needle and not merely reflect the times but pose important questions about race, gender, class, sexuality, and identity at large.

Introductory Fiction

CWR 204 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Alaa Al Aswany · Aleksandar Hemon · Daphne Kalotay · A.M. Homes · Idra Novey

The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers a perspective on the place of literature among the liberal arts. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student's growth as both creator and reader of literature.

Literary Translation

CWR 206 / TRA 206 / COM 215 · Spring 2021

C01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 3:20 PM

Instructors: Jhumpa Lahiri

Students will choose, early in the semester, one author to focus on in fiction, poetry, or drama, with the goal of arriving at a 20-25 page sample of the author's work. All work will be translated into English and discussed in a workshop format. Weekly readings will focus on the comparison of pre-existing translations as well as commentaries on the art and practice of literary translation.

Yaass Queen: Gay Men, Straight Women, and the Literature, Art, and Film of Hagdom

CWR 207 / THR 207 / GSS 220 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 3:20 PM

Instructors: Hilton Als

Modern queer writers have long written about the rich and complicated relationship straight cis women have had with queer men. And yet, outside of queer literary circles, little attention has been paid to how these relationships challenge or replicate traditional family structures, and form a community outside of the status quo. We will examine the stories male writers constructed and analyze women writers who held a mirror up to those straight and queer men who were drawn to lesbian culture. By examining photography and painting, we will further look at the artist's relationship to and identification with queerness, or straight female power.

Advanced Poetry

CWR 302 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Rowan Ricardo Phillips · Susan Wheeler

Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts.

Advanced Fiction

CWR 304 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Alaa Al Aswany · Aleksandar Hemon

Advanced practice in the original composition of fiction for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the place of literature among the liberal arts. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student's growth as both creator and reader of literature.

Playwriting II: Intermediate Playwriting

THR 305 / CWR 309 · Spring 2021

S01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Migdalia Cruz

A continuation of work begun in Introductory Playwriting, in this class, students will complete either one full-length play or two long one-acts (40-60 pages) to the end of gaining a firmer understanding of characterization, dialogue, structure, and the playwriting process. In addition to questions of craft, an emphasis will be placed on the formation of healthy creative habits and the sharpening of critical and analytical skills through reading and responding to work of both fellow students and contemporary playwrights of note.

Advanced Literary Translation

CWR 306 / COM 356 · Spring 2021

C01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 3:20 PM

Instructors: Jhumpa Lahiri

Students will choose, early in the semester, one author to focus on in fiction, poetry, or drama, with the goal of arriving at a 20-25 page sample of the author's work. All work will be translated into English and discussed in a workshop format. Weekly readings will focus on the comparison of pre-existing translations as well as commentaries on the art and practice of literary translation.

Life is Short, Art is Really Short

CWR 315 · Spring 2021

C01 - James Richardson · Tuesdays, 1:30-3:50 PM

Instructors: James Richardson

All literature is short — compared to our lives, anyway — but we'll be concentrating on poetry and prose at their very shortest. The reading will include proverbs, aphorisms, greguerias, one-line poems, riddles, jokes, fragments, haiku, epigrams and microlyrics. Imagism, contemporary shortists, prose poems, various longer works assembled from small pieces, and possibly even flash fiction. Students will take away from the thrift and edge of these literary microorganisms a new sense of what can be left out of your work and new ideas about how those nebulae of pre-draft in your notebooks might condense into stars and constellations.

Writing Near Art/Art Near Writing

VIS 323 / CWR 323 / ENG 232 / JRN 323 · Spring 2021

C01 · Fridays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Rindon Johnson

What we'll be writing together won't quite be art criticism and it won't quite be traditional historical writing either, what we'll be writing together is something more akin to poetry, fiction, art criticism and theory fused into a multivalent mass. Keeping in mind that language can hold many things inside of itself, we'll use somatic and idiosyncratic techniques as a lens, reading a range of poets, theorists, critics, writers and artists who are all thinking with art while writing about bodies, subjectivity, landscape, and the inimitable forms that emerge from the studio.

Introduction to Screenwriting: Writing for a Global Audience

CWR 349 / VIS 349 · Spring 2021

C01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-3:50 PM

Instructors: Christina Lazaridi

How can screenwriters prepare for the evolving challenges of our global media world? What types of content, as well as form, will emerging technologies make possible? Do fields like neuroscience help us understand the universal principals behind screenwriting and do tech advances that alter the distance between audience and creator, man and machine, also influence content of our stories?

Advanced Screenwriting: Writing for Television

CWR 405 / VIS 405 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Susanna Styron

This advanced screenwriting workshop will introduce students to the fundamental elements of developing and writing a TV series in the current “golden age of television.” Students will watch television pilots, read pilot episodes, and engage in in-depth discussion about story, series engine, character, structure, tone and season arcs. Each student will formulate and pitch an original series idea, and complete the first draft of the pilot episode and season arcs by end of semester.

Revision Workshop

THR 409 / CWR 409 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Nathan Davis

This course will explore, through theory and (especially) practice, the rewriting/revising of plays, screenplays and teleplays. Students will begin the semester with a written piece of dramatic material that they wish to develop further. Through discussion, writing exercises, group feedback, and the study of existing scripts, each student will devise a revision process that is appropriate for their material and emerge with a new draft.

How to Write a Song

ATL 496 / CWR 496 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Bridget Kearney · Paul Muldoon

Taught by Bridget Kearney (Lake Street Dive) and Paul Muldoon (Rogue Oliphant) with class visits from guest singer/songwriters and music critics, this course is an introduction to the art of writing words for music, an art at the core of our literary tradition from the Beowulf poet through Lord Byron and Bessie Smith to Bob Dylan and the Notorious B.I.G. Composers, writers and performers will have the opportunity to work in small songwriting teams to respond to such emotionally charged themes as Gratitude, Loss, Protest, Desire, Joyousness, Remorse, and Defiance.

Dance

The Radical Imagination

FRS 144 · Spring 2021

FRS 144 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Jaamil Olawale Kosoko

How does the use of one’s imagination spark social and systemic change in the world? What does it mean to devote one's life to this kind of work? Blurring the lines between the creative and political experience, students will be introduced to the radical contemporary practices that interdisciplinary artists use to build creative, impactful lives. Our texts will include live and recorded performances, as well as historical and theoretical secondary sources. Every other week the class hosts an artist talk series featuring pioneering artists.

Practice

DAN 206 / MTD 206 / THR 206 · Spring 2021

U01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:30 - 2:50 PM

Instructors: Aynsley Vandenbroucke

The writer Annie Dillard says that how we spend our days is how we spend our lives. With school as we know it upended, we have a unique opportunity to develop daily habits that contribute to lifelong independent learning and creating. We will look at practice as both verb and noun, paying special attention to the ways we embody the work (and change) we want to see in the world. Through somatic activities, talks with invited guests, projects, and readings (across the arts, sciences, philosophy, religion, and activism), we'll revel in the interplay between process and product, solitude and community, structure and freedom, life and art.

Introduction to Contemporary Dance

DAN 213 · Spring 2021

U01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 12:30 - 2:20 PM

Instructors: Alexandra Beller

This course offers a broad, embodied introduction to the breadth of contemporary dance. We will be moving, reading, watching, and writing about dance. Contemporary issues, such as Black Lives Matter, LGBTQ rights, immigration, and American exceptionalism will be viewed through the lens of contemporary dance. We will try on the styles of essential creators in the field in an effort to understand their POV. We will create work ourselves (no experience necessary) to learn about the expressive and communicative potential of dance. We will be moving and meditating to release tension, increase personal awareness, and boost authenticity.

Stillness

DAN 221 / THR 222 · Spring 2021

U01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Aynsley Vandenbroucke

In a universe filled with movement, how and why and where might we find relative stillness? What are the unique aesthetic, political, and daily life possibilities while school as we know it is on pause? We’ll dance, sit, question, and create practices and projects. We’ll play with movement within stillness, stillness within movement, stillness in performance and in performers' minds. We’ll look at stillness as protest and power. We’ll wonder when stillness might be an abdication of responsibility. We'll read widely within religions, philosophy, performance, disability studies, social justice, visual art, sound (and silence).

Introduction to Hip-Hop Dance

DAN 222 / AAS 222 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Joseph Schloss · Raphael Xavier

This introductory survey course gives equal weight to scholarly study and embodied practice, using both approaches to explore a range of hip-hop dance techniques, as well as the cultural and historical contexts from which these dances emerged. Special attention will be given to breaking – the most prominent hip-hop form – as a foundation for exploring other forms of movement. By critically exploring these physical and historical connections, individuals will adapt and apply their own philosophies to dance in order to develop a personalized style.

Experiential Anatomy

DAN 224 · Spring 2021

U01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 12:30-2:20 PM

Instructors: Sasha Welsh

This course introduces students to human anatomy using movement, drawing, and dance practices. We will study the structure and function of the body from an interdisciplinary perspective, with a focus on relationships between cognition, the nervous system and movement.

Introduction to Breaking: Deciphering its Power

DAN 225 · Spring 2021

U01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Raphael Xavier

This introductory course gives equal weight to scholarly study and embodied practice, using both approaches to explore the flow, power and cultural contexts of Breaking. This course will focus on developing a clear foundational Breaking technique in order to build a strong basis for exploring other Hip-Hop forms. By critically exploring this form physically and historically, individuals will adapt and apply their own philosophies to dance in order to eventually develop a personalized style.

Making Work

DAN 226 / THR 226 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays, 12:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Miguel Gutierrez

This course is a laboratory space for intentional community where we focus on the creative process in making movement-based performance and dance. I offer prompts for you to make short performances and then we reverse engineer your process through a series of questions. We are interested in understanding how our work sits inside of the contemporary context. We will critique, absorb and discard inherited notions of dance in the service of creating pieces that come from a vital and necessary place. Reading ranges from artist statements to critical theory and you will watch works on video that reframe ideas of the choreographic.

Body and Object: Making Art that is both Sculpture and Dance

VIS 300 / DAN 301 · Spring 2021

U01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Martha Friedman · Susan Marshall

Students in VIS300/DAN301 will create sculptures that relate directly to the body and compel performance, interaction, and movement. Students will also create dances that are informed by garments, portable objects, and props. Works will be designed for unconventional spaces, challenge viewer/performer/object relationships, augment and constrain the body, and trace the body's actions and form. The class will consider how context informs perceptions of the borders between performance, bodies, and objects. A lecture series of prominent choreographers and artists will accompany the course. This studio course is open enrollment.

Performance in Extraordinary Times: Documenting and Analyzing the Present

DAN 314 / AMS 335 / ANT 356 / THR 314 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Judith Hamera

Performance and crisis have always been partners: entangled in epidemics, state violence and resistance, and austerity regimes, as well as the crisis ordinariness of settler colonialism and structural racism. This seminar examines performance in our extraordinary present using autoethnography, ethnography, and interviews.

Choreography Studio

DAN 317 · Spring 2021

U01 · Fridays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Susan Marshall

This seminar is designed for junior dance certificate students to investigate current dance practices and ideas. Part study and discussion of the processes, aesthetics and politics involved in dance making and viewing — part independent creative practice and critique — this course invites students to a deeper understanding of their own art making perspectives and to those of their classmates.

Moving Writing: Memoir and the Work of Dance

DAN 329 / AMS 329 / GSS 433 · Spring 2021

S01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Judith Hamera

What can memoirs teach us about navigating the demands of a life in dance, and about the ways these demands are profoundly intersectional: shaped by racial, gender, and class hierarchies and economies? This seminar examines memoir as an activist project and mode of performance illuminating the work of dance. Readings include works by Carlos Acosta, Misty Copeland, Li Cunxin, Mark Morris, Jock Soto, and others. Theories of personal narrative theory and autobiography guide our discussions. Students will conduct oral history interviews and investigate personal papers in local archives as forms of memoir. Emphasis on dancers in the Americas.

Performance as Art

VIS 354 / DAN 354 / THR 354 · Spring 2021

U01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper

This studio class will explore a broad range of approaches to art-based performance: from instruction pieces and happenings, to the body as language and gesture, to performance as a form of archiving

Approaches to Contemporary Dance and Movement Practices

DAN 408 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays + Wednesdays, 4:30 - 6:20 PM

Instructors: Kyle Abraham

This advanced studio course compares diverse approaches to contemporary dance, improvisation and black diasporic forms to explore how dance training fuels individual development, choreographic process and aesthetic research.

Ballet as an Evolving Form: Technique and Repertory

DAN 432 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays, Wednesdays + Thursdays 4:30 - 6:20 PM

Instructors: Tina Fehlandt

A studio course in Contemporary Ballet technique for advanced dancers, with explorations into neoclassical and contemporary choreography through readings, viewings, and the learning of and creation of repertory. Through visits with prominent guest artists, including Sonja Kostich and Stella Abrera, Theresa Ruth Howard, and Phil Chan, students will examine the shifts that "Ballet" is making to stay relevant and meaningful as a "21st" century art form.

Music Theater

Practice

DAN 206 / MTD 206 / THR 206 · Spring 2021

U01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:30 - 2:50 PM

Instructors: Aynsley Vandenbroucke

The writer Annie Dillard says that how we spend our days is how we spend our lives. With school as we know it upended, we have a unique opportunity to develop daily habits that contribute to lifelong independent learning and creating. We will look at practice as both verb and noun, paying special attention to the ways we embody the work (and change) we want to see in the world. Through somatic activities, talks with invited guests, projects, and readings (across the arts, sciences, philosophy, religion, and activism), we'll revel in the interplay between process and product, solitude and community, structure and freedom, life and art.

Introduction to Set and Costume Design

THR 213 / MTD 213 / VIS 210 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Rachel Hauck · Sarita Fellows

This course introduces students to set and costume design for performance, exploring theater as a visual medium. Students will develop their ability to think about the physical environment (including clothing) as key components of story-telling and our understanding of human experience. Students will expand their vocabulary for discussing the visual world and work on their collaborative skills.

The Nature of Theatrical Reinvention

THR 334 / MTD 334 · Spring 2021

S01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: John Doyle

This seminar explores how iconic pieces of theatre can be re-explored for modern audiences.The course will examine various aspects of how an artist can think "out-of-the-box" and the mechanisms the artist can use to do so.

The Art of Producing Theater

THR 361 / MTD 361 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 11 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Mara Isaacs

This course explores models of producing and collaboration in the professional theater, with an emphasis on the relationship between reading and producing plays. Students will examine a wide variety of classic and contemporary plays and musicals as literature written for production with a detailed appreciation for what production entails, and will develop an understanding of the aesthetic, dramaturgical and values-based choices involved in producing theater.

Theater

Introduction to Theater Making

THR 101 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Aaron Landsman · Elena Araoz

Introduction to Theatre Making is a working laboratory, which gives students hands-on experience with theatre's fundamental building blocks - writing, design, acting, directing, and producing.

The Radical Imagination

FRS 144 · Spring 2021

FRS 144 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Jaamil Olawale Kosoko

How does the use of one’s imagination spark social and systemic change in the world? What does it mean to devote one's life to this kind of work? Blurring the lines between the creative and political experience, students will be introduced to the radical contemporary practices that interdisciplinary artists use to build creative, impactful lives. Our texts will include live and recorded performances, as well as historical and theoretical secondary sources. Every other week the class hosts an artist talk series featuring pioneering artists.

Beginning Studies in Acting

THR 201 · Spring 2021

C01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 2:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Suzanne Agins

An introduction to the craft of acting through scene study monologues and, finally, a longer scene drawn from a play, to develop a method of working on a script. Emphasis will be placed on honesty, spontaneity, and establishing a personal connection with the scene's substance.

Introductory Playwriting

THR 205 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays + Wednesdays, 1:30 - 3:20 PM

Instructors: Robert N. Sandberg

This is a workshop in the fundamentals of writing plays. Through writing prompts, exercises, study and reflection, students will be guided in the creation of original dramatic material. Attention will be given to character, structure, dramatic action, monologue, dialogue, language and behavior.

Practice

DAN 206 / MTD 206 / THR 206 · Spring 2021

U01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:30 - 2:50 PM

Instructors: Aynsley Vandenbroucke

The writer Annie Dillard says that how we spend our days is how we spend our lives. With school as we know it upended, we have a unique opportunity to develop daily habits that contribute to lifelong independent learning and creating. We will look at practice as both verb and noun, paying special attention to the ways we embody the work (and change) we want to see in the world. Through somatic activities, talks with invited guests, projects, and readings (across the arts, sciences, philosophy, religion, and activism), we'll revel in the interplay between process and product, solitude and community, structure and freedom, life and art.

Yaass Queen: Gay Men, Straight Women, and the Literature, Art, and Film of Hagdom

CWR 207 / THR 207 / GSS 220 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 3:20 PM

Instructors: Hilton Als

Modern queer writers have long written about the rich and complicated relationship straight cis women have had with queer men. And yet, outside of queer literary circles, little attention has been paid to how these relationships challenge or replicate traditional family structures, and form a community outside of the status quo. We will examine the stories male writers constructed and analyze women writers who held a mirror up to those straight and queer men who were drawn to lesbian culture. By examining photography and painting, we will further look at the artist's relationship to and identification with queerness, or straight female power.

Introduction to Set and Costume Design

THR 213 / MTD 213 / VIS 210 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Rachel Hauck · Sarita Fellows

This course introduces students to set and costume design for performance, exploring theater as a visual medium. Students will develop their ability to think about the physical environment (including clothing) as key components of story-telling and our understanding of human experience. Students will expand their vocabulary for discussing the visual world and work on their collaborative skills.

Theater and the Plague

THR 220 / COM 246 / ENG 226 / GHP 320 · Spring 2021

S01 · Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Michael Cadden

Theater relies on the physical and emotional vulnerability of live bodies to experience the pity andterror that plague, war, systemic injustice, and more ordinary forms of disease and death inflict. As we face the twin pandemics of our own time, what can "plague drama" (prompted by outbreaks of typhus, bubonic plague, cholera, AIDS, etc.) tell us about how writers use literal and metaphorical diseases to give shape to a given cultural moment? We'll look at a wide variety mostly theatrical texts to explore how playwrights use the medium of the theater to literally embody and thus make visible physical, social, and metaphysical "dis-ease".

Stillness

DAN 221 / THR 222 · Spring 2021

U01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Aynsley Vandenbroucke

In a universe filled with movement, how and why and where might we find relative stillness? What are the unique aesthetic, political, and daily life possibilities while school as we know it is on pause? We’ll dance, sit, question, and create practices and projects. We’ll play with movement within stillness, stillness within movement, stillness in performance and in performers' minds. We’ll look at stillness as protest and power. We’ll wonder when stillness might be an abdication of responsibility. We'll read widely within religions, philosophy, performance, disability studies, social justice, visual art, sound (and silence).

Making Work

DAN 226 / THR 226 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays, 12:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Miguel Gutierrez

This course is a laboratory space for intentional community where we focus on the creative process in making movement-based performance and dance. I offer prompts for you to make short performances and then we reverse engineer your process through a series of questions. We are interested in understanding how our work sits inside of the contemporary context. We will critique, absorb and discard inherited notions of dance in the service of creating pieces that come from a vital and necessary place. Reading ranges from artist statements to critical theory and you will watch works on video that reframe ideas of the choreographic.

Contemporary French Theater

FRE 228 / THR 227 · Spring 2021

C01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:30-2:50 PM

Instructors: Florent Masse

Contemporary French Theater will introduce students to the vibrant and diverse scene of contemporary theater in France. Every week we will read a new play by a celebrated or an emerging living playwright, and examine their shared topics of interest and writing styles.

Introduction to Irish Studies

ENG 228 / THR 228 · Spring 2021

S01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Fintan O'Toole

This interdisciplinary 200-level course offers a broad introduction to the study of Irish literature, history and culture.

One Flea Spare Project

THR 251 · Spring 2021

U01 · Mondays + Wednesdays, 1:30-2:50 PM

Instructors: Elena Araoz

In a joint project with students from Fordham University, Georgetown University, Purchase College, and UMass-Amherst, students will create a virtual new media response to Naomi Wallace' play One Flea Spare. This story about strangers quarantining together during London's 17th Century Great Plague, will provoke our wild artistic departure about our own communities' social iniquities, abuses of power, classism, racism, burden on essential workers, fake science, and questions about who can afford to survive a plague and the boundaries of gender and the body. Absolutely no theatre or performance experience necessary, just a desire to be creative.

Acting – Scene Study

THR 301 · Spring 2021

C01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM Thursdays, 1:30 - 3:20 PM

Instructors: Mark Nelson

The preparation, rehearsal and presentation of scenes from classic and contemporary plays, from Chekhov and Ibsen to Tony Kusher and Lynn Nottage. We will use the techniques and principles found in Uta Hagen's book, Respect of Acting.

Ghosts, Vampires and Zombies in Irish Theater and Literature

THR 302 / ENG 222 · Spring 2021

S01 · Thursdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Fintan O'Toole

From the spirits and banshees of oral legends to Bram Stoker's Dracula, from the classic works of Yeats, Synge and Beckett to Garth Ennis's Preacher comics and Anne Rice's Vampire novels, Irish culture has been haunted by the Otherworld. Why has the Irish Gothic had such a long ghostly afterlife on page and stage? Can we learn something about modernist works like those of Yeats and Beckett by seeing them through the perspective of popular fictions of the supernatural?

Playwriting II: Intermediate Playwriting

THR 305 / CWR 309 · Spring 2021

S01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Migdalia Cruz

A continuation of work begun in Introductory Playwriting, in this class, students will complete either one full-length play or two long one-acts (40-60 pages) to the end of gaining a firmer understanding of characterization, dialogue, structure, and the playwriting process. In addition to questions of craft, an emphasis will be placed on the formation of healthy creative habits and the sharpening of critical and analytical skills through reading and responding to work of both fellow students and contemporary playwrights of note.

Advanced French Theater Workshop

FRE 311 / THR 312 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Florent Masse

In Advanced French Theater Workshop, students will focus their work on three main French playwrights: one classical, one modern, and one contemporary. This year, students will rehearse and perform excerpts from the great works of Molière, Alfred de Musset, and Pascal Rambert.

Performance in Extraordinary Times: Documenting and Analyzing the Present

DAN 314 / AMS 335 / ANT 356 / THR 314 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Judith Hamera

Performance and crisis have always been partners: entangled in epidemics, state violence and resistance, and austerity regimes, as well as the crisis ordinariness of settler colonialism and structural racism. This seminar examines performance in our extraordinary present using autoethnography, ethnography, and interviews.

The Nature of Theatrical Reinvention

THR 334 / MTD 334 · Spring 2021

S01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: John Doyle

This seminar explores how iconic pieces of theatre can be re-explored for modern audiences.The course will examine various aspects of how an artist can think "out-of-the-box" and the mechanisms the artist can use to do so.

Arts in the Invisible City: Race, Policy, Performance

HUM 352 / THR 350 / URB 352 / ENG 252 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Nathan Davis

A so-called invisible city, Trenton is one of the poorest parts of the state, but intimately connected to Princeton. Examining the historical and contemporary racisms that have shaped Trenton, we will hear from activists, policy makers, artistic directors, politicians, and artists. Readings include texts about urban invisibility, race, community theater, and public arts policy. The course will follow the development of a new play by Trenton's Passage Theater, about a community-organized sculpture that was removed over "concerns" about "gang" culture. Students will conduct field interviews and work alongside dramatists and playwrights.

Performance as Art

VIS 354 / DAN 354 / THR 354 · Spring 2021

U01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper

This studio class will explore a broad range of approaches to art-based performance: from instruction pieces and happenings, to the body as language and gesture, to performance as a form of archiving

The Art of Producing Theater

THR 361 / MTD 361 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 11 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Mara Isaacs

This course explores models of producing and collaboration in the professional theater, with an emphasis on the relationship between reading and producing plays. Students will examine a wide variety of classic and contemporary plays and musicals as literature written for production with a detailed appreciation for what production entails, and will develop an understanding of the aesthetic, dramaturgical and values-based choices involved in producing theater.

World Drama

ENG 380 / COM 247 / THR 380 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays & Wednesdays, 11 am - 12:20 pm

Instructors: Robert N. Sandberg

This course is a survey of classical and modern drama from Africa, China, India, Japan, and Latin America. Topics will include Noh and Kabuki, Beijing Opera, Sanskrit theater, Nigerian masquerades and a variety of selections from the rich modern Indian and Latin American canons.

Theater and Society Now

THR 385 / AMS 385 / GSS 385 / LAO 385 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Brian Herrera

As an art form, theater operates in the shared space and time of the present moment while also manifesting imagined worlds untethered by the limits of "real" life. In this course, we undertake a critical, creative, and historical survey of the ways contemporary theater-making in the United States — as both industry and creative practice — does (and does not) engage the most urgent concerns of contemporary American society.

Revision Workshop

THR 409 / CWR 409 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Nathan Davis

This course will explore, through theory and (especially) practice, the rewriting/revising of plays, screenplays and teleplays. Students will begin the semester with a written piece of dramatic material that they wish to develop further. Through discussion, writing exercises, group feedback, and the study of existing scripts, each student will devise a revision process that is appropriate for their material and emerge with a new draft.

Decentering/Recentering the Western Canon in the Contemporary American Theater

THR 416 / AMS 416 / COM 453 / ENG 456 · Spring 2021

S01 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 11 AM - 12:20 PM

Instructors: Michael Cadden

Why do some BIPOC dramatists (from the US and Canada) choose to adapt/revise/re-envision/deconstruct/rewrite/appropriate canonical texts from the Western theatrical tradition? While their choices might be accused of re-centering and reinforcing "white"narratives that often marginalize and/or exoticize racial and ethnic others, we might also see this risky venture as a useful strategy to write oneself into a tradition that is itself constantly being revised and reevaluated and to claim that tradition as one's own. What are the artistic, cultural, and economic "rewards"for deploying this method of playmaking? What are risks?

Darkness and Light: Writing, Lighting, Blackness and Whiteness

ATL 494 / THR 494 · Spring 2021

C01 · Fridays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Branden Jacobs-Jenkins · Jane Cox

How do you connect your verbal and your visual brain? This course will be a series of provocations to making art. Black playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins and White lighting designer Jane Cox will lead the group in connected investigations in writing and lighting as well as intertwined historic and aesthetic notions of Whiteness and Blackness. We will focus our imagination on theatrical and poetic connotations of dark and light as well as the production and philosophies of light. Classes will consist of discussions and creative exercises, and we will work towards a showing of creative projects at the end of the semester.

Art and Change in the Panopticon

ATL 495 / THR 495 · Spring 2021

C01 — Christine Jones + Gabriel Kahane · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Christine Jones

How might our obsession with convenience constrict our humanity? Is it possible to critique and dismantle systems of oppression from within? How do we reconcile the artist's need to enter into the experience of the Other with the need to be aware of structural inequities and the asymmetrical distribution of power? Join Christine Jones and Gabriel Kahane for a semester-long exploration of how we may aspire to change the world through art-making in a moment widely described as dystopian.

Visual Arts

Poetry in the Political & Sexual Revolution of the 1960s & 70s

FRS 102 · Spring 2021

FRS 102 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Alex Dimitrov

What does artistic production look like during a time of cultural unrest? How did America’s poets help shape the political landscape of the American 60s and 70s, two decades that saw the rise of the Black Panthers, “Flower Power,” psychedelia, and Vietnam War protests? Through reading poetry, studying films like Easy Rider, and engaging with the music of the times (Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix, The Doors) we will think about art’s ability to move the cultural needle and not merely reflect the times but pose important questions about race, gender, class, sexuality, and identity at large.

Representation in Documentary Filmmaking

FRS 138 · Spring 2021

FRS 138 · Tuesdays, 7:30 - 10:20 PM

Instructors: Bent-Jorgen Perlmutt

Documentary filmmakers engage with the world by representing it in a myriad of subjective ways. This course will focus on cross-cultural issues surrounding representation in documentary filmmaking, both in front of and behind the camera. Through film production, screenings, texts, and discussions, this course will explore the central question of “who has the right tell whose story, and why?” Each student will produce, direct, shoot, and edit two 3-5 minute documentary films.

Drawing Data

FRS 174 · Spring 2021

FRS 174 · Tuesdays + Thursdays, 1:30 - 2:50 PM

Instructors: Tim Szetela

Using an array of site-specific, creative research methods, students will explore their local environments (inside and out) searching for data and the patterns, stories, and observations that follow. They will catalog and document their findings into evolving multimedia archives, iterating on various modes of collection and communication. Some of the topics covered include: Personal and Local Data, Documentary & Observational Drawing, Sound & Sensory Visualization, Data Collection, Data-Driven Storytelling, and Archival Research and Design.

Drawing I

VIS 202 / ARC 202 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Eve Aschheim

The great thing about drawing is you can do it anywhere! This course approaches drawing as a way of thinking and seeing. We'll introduce basic techniques while also encouraging experimentation, with a focus on both drawing from life and drawing as an expressive act. Students will be introduced to the basics of line, shading, proportion, composition, texture and gesture.

Painting I

VIS 204 / ARC 328 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Colleen Asper · Pam Lins

An introduction to the materials and methods of painting, addressing form and light, color and its interaction, composition, scale, texture and gesture. Students will experiment with subject matter including still life, landscape, architecture, self-portraiture and abstraction, while painting from a variety of sources.

Feminist Technoscience: Art, Technology, & Gender

VIS 206 · Spring 2021

U01 · Tuesdays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Ani Liu

How does scientific research produce and reinforce concepts of gender? How is sexism propagated through technological media? This course investigates how scientific and technological media shape culture and society, particularly through the lens of gender and sexuality. Through interdisciplinary art making, students will use various technological media to reflect on the social, political, and ethical aspects of technoscientific feminism. Students will develop skills in 3d modeling, rendering, augmented reality, Illustrator, and Photoshop, creating art works in critical social discourse and gender theory.

Analog Photography

VIS 212 · Spring 2021

C01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Staff

An introduction to the processes of photography through a series of problems directed toward lens projection, the handling of light-sensitive material, and camera operation. Students will receive a kit that will contain the equipment and materials for analog image making, beginning with cyanotype printing and culminating with large format film exposure and processing.

Digital Photography

VIS 213 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Deana Lawson · Jeff Whetstone

This studio course introduces students to the aesthetic and theoretical implications of digital photography. Emphasis will be on gaining competency with digital equipment and editing techniques so that students can learn to express themselves and their ideas through the medium.

Introduction to Set and Costume Design

THR 213 / MTD 213 / VIS 210 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Rachel Hauck · Sarita Fellows

This course introduces students to set and costume design for performance, exploring theater as a visual medium. Students will develop their ability to think about the physical environment (including clothing) as key components of story-telling and our understanding of human experience. Students will expand their vocabulary for discussing the visual world and work on their collaborative skills.

Graphic Design: Image

VIS 218 · Spring 2021

U01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Laurel Schwulst

This studio course engages students in the decoding of and formal experimentation with the image as a two-dimensional surface. Through projects, readings, and discussions, students take a hands-on approach to making with an array of technologies (the camera, video camera, computer, solar printing, web publishing) and forms (billboard, symbol, screensaver, book) to address the most basic principles of design, such as visual metaphor, composition, sequence, hierarchy, and scale.

Digital Animation

VIS 220 · Spring 2021

S01 — Tim Szetela · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Tim Szetela

This studio production class will engage in a variety of timed-based composition, visualization, and storytelling techniques. Students will learn foundational methods of 2D animation, acquire a working knowledge of digital animation software and technology, and explore the connective space between sound, image, and motion possible in animated film.

Sculpture I

VIS 222 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Amy Yao · Kenneth Tam

This class will be a studio introduction to sculpture, with particular emphasis on the study of how form, space, and a wide variety of materials and processes influence the visual properties of sculpture and the making of meaning.

Sound/Material/Mind

VIS 226 / MUS 228 · Spring 2021

U01 · Fridays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Jess Rowland

In this course, students will reconsider sound as material through projects exploring physical technologies of sound-making along with listening and viewings of related arts and artists, readings and writings in theories of sound, new media, and phenomenology. This class offers a hybrid experience-an engagement with art-making and seminar, reconsidering our relationship to the body, physical material, and sound embodied in the world.

Video Installation

VIS 230 · Spring 2021

U01 · Thursdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Glen Fogel

This studio course investigates video installation as a contemporary art form that extends the conversation of video art beyond the frame and into live, site-specific multi-channel environments.

Methods of Color Photography

VIS 231 · Spring 2021

U01 - Deana Lawson · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Deana Lawson

This course takes an exciting approach to color photography using methods of cameraless and lens based analog photography. We will experiment with Anthotypes, Lumens, Chlorophyll printing, and Polaroids. Several of the materials needed for this course can be found in your backyard or kitchen cabinet!

Narrative Filmmaking I

VIS 265 · Spring 2021

L01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Charlotte Glynn

Narrative Filmmaking 1 is a hands-on production class designed for students from all academic backgrounds to learn about the art of video production and develop their creative voices using cellphones! The course will cover technical aspects of making films, including shot language, sound recording, and editing, and will explore what it means to make images at this critical moment of time.

Body and Object: Making Art that is both Sculpture and Dance

VIS 300 / DAN 301 · Spring 2021

U01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Martha Friedman · Susan Marshall

Students in VIS300/DAN301 will create sculptures that relate directly to the body and compel performance, interaction, and movement. Students will also create dances that are informed by garments, portable objects, and props. Works will be designed for unconventional spaces, challenge viewer/performer/object relationships, augment and constrain the body, and trace the body's actions and form. The class will consider how context informs perceptions of the borders between performance, bodies, and objects. A lecture series of prominent choreographers and artists will accompany the course. This studio course is open enrollment.

Printmaking I

VIS 309 · Spring 2021

C01 - Daniel Heyman · Fridays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Daniel Heyman

In an increasingly digital world, this course promotes the hand-made image, teaching students to cut blocks, fashion stencils, plan and execute color layers all in pursuit of the development of subject matter. Block and stencil printmaking can be done anywhere - non-toxically - while still producing strong expressive images.

Fascism in Italian Cinema

ITA 312 / VIS 445 · Spring 2021

Multiple sections offered

Instructors: Gaetana Marrone-Puglia

This course, conducted in English, is a study of Fascism through selected films from World War II to the present. The approach is interdisciplinary and combines the analysis of historical themes with an in-depth cinematic reading of the films.

Writing Near Art/Art Near Writing

VIS 323 / CWR 323 / ENG 232 / JRN 323 · Spring 2021

C01 · Fridays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: Rindon Johnson

What we'll be writing together won't quite be art criticism and it won't quite be traditional historical writing either, what we'll be writing together is something more akin to poetry, fiction, art criticism and theory fused into a multivalent mass. Keeping in mind that language can hold many things inside of itself, we'll use somatic and idiosyncratic techniques as a lens, reading a range of poets, theorists, critics, writers and artists who are all thinking with art while writing about bodies, subjectivity, landscape, and the inimitable forms that emerge from the studio.

Introduction to Screenwriting: Writing for a Global Audience

CWR 349 / VIS 349 · Spring 2021

C01 · Wednesdays, 1:30-3:50 PM

Instructors: Christina Lazaridi

How can screenwriters prepare for the evolving challenges of our global media world? What types of content, as well as form, will emerging technologies make possible? Do fields like neuroscience help us understand the universal principals behind screenwriting and do tech advances that alter the distance between audience and creator, man and machine, also influence content of our stories?

Performance as Art

VIS 354 / DAN 354 / THR 354 · Spring 2021

U01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Colleen Asper

This studio class will explore a broad range of approaches to art-based performance: from instruction pieces and happenings, to the body as language and gesture, to performance as a form of archiving

Documentary Filmmaking II

VIS 363 · Spring 2021

C01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Su Friedrich

What does it take to make a great documentary film? How does subject matter influence decisions about camera, lighting, sound and editing? This class will take a deep dive into those questions by screening, discussing and writing short analyses of various films.

Advanced Screenwriting: Writing for Television

CWR 405 / VIS 405 · Spring 2021

C01 · Mondays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Susanna Styron

This advanced screenwriting workshop will introduce students to the fundamental elements of developing and writing a TV series in the current “golden age of television.” Students will watch television pilots, read pilot episodes, and engage in in-depth discussion about story, series engine, character, structure, tone and season arcs. Each student will formulate and pitch an original series idea, and complete the first draft of the pilot episode and season arcs by end of semester.

Advanced Questions in Photography

VIS 411 · Spring 2021

C01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Deana Lawson

Advanced Questions in Photography will examine ways in which lens-based media can interrogate representation, class, gender and race. The class will look artists of the 1960's through 1990's such as Eleanor Antin, Adrian Piper, Douglas Huebler, Martha Rosler, Barbara Kruger, Carrie Mae Weems, Felix Gonzales Torres, Lyle Ashton Harris and more recent artists Trevor Paglen, Hank Willis Thomas, Jason Lazarus, Walead Beshty and Hito Steyerl.

Advanced Graphic Design

VIS 415 · Spring 2021

U01 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: David Reinfurt

This studio course builds on the skills and concepts of the 200-level Graphic Design classes. VIS 415 is structured around three studio assignments that connect graphic design to other bodies of knowledge, aesthetic experience, and scholarship. The class always takes a local concept or event as the impetus for investigations. Studio work is supplemented by critiques, readings and lectures. Students will refine their approaches to information design and visual problem solving, and to decoding and producing graphic design in print and electronic media.

Spring Film Seminar

VIS 419 · Spring 2021

S01 · Mondays, 7:30 - 10:20 PM

Instructors: Su Friedrich

This class concentrates on the editing process. Students will re-edit samples from narrative and documentary films and analyze the results. We will also critique ongoing edits of your own thesis films.

Sculpture II

VIS 421 · Spring 2021

U01 · Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Amy Yao

This sculpture class will engage contemporary approaches to the figure with an emphasis on the figure as body. Students will take a multivalent approach to the historical precedents from which current representations have emerged and explore the limits of what constitutes the body and figuration in contemporary sculpture through the process of class discussions and making sculpture.

Avant-Gardism & (Anti) Capitalism

ART 494 / VIS 494 / ECS 494 · Spring 2021

S01 · Mondays, 1:30-4:20 PM

Instructors: AnnMarie Perl · Hal Foster

Modern art is coeval with the modern market. This seminar examines key moments in this complicated relationship. Under what conditions does an artistic avant-garde emerge? In what ways does it advance the interests of capital? In what ways does it challenge them? How do artistic forms change vis-à-vis transformations in economic modes of production and consumption? These and other questions will be probed with test cases drawn from Impressionist painting, modern architecture, mass culture, Dada, Pop, Minimalism, and postmodernist art.

Visualizing the Battle Cry

ATL 497 / AAS 497 / VIS 497 · Spring 2021

C01 · Fridays, 7:30-10:20 PM

Instructors: Imani Perry · Mario Moore

Inspired by the experience of Black Civil War soldiers, the visual aesthetics of 19th century posters, and contemporary hip-hop, the award-winning writer and historian Imani Perry and the visual artist Mario Moore will collaborate on a groundbreaking new project. Using hip-hop to reimagine the soundscape of battle in the mid-1800s, Moore and Perry will negotiate both the historical record and the idea of what might have been. Students will work alongside Moore and Perry in drawing on language, visual prints and audio to make connections between the 19th century and our own revolutionary moment.

Music

Poetry in the Political & Sexual Revolution of the 1960s & 70s

FRS 102 · Spring 2021

FRS 102 · Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Alex Dimitrov

What does artistic production look like during a time of cultural unrest? How did America’s poets help shape the political landscape of the American 60s and 70s, two decades that saw the rise of the Black Panthers, “Flower Power,” psychedelia, and Vietnam War protests? Through reading poetry, studying films like Easy Rider, and engaging with the music of the times (Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix, The Doors) we will think about art’s ability to move the cultural needle and not merely reflect the times but pose important questions about race, gender, class, sexuality, and identity at large.

Sound/Material/Mind

VIS 226 / MUS 228 · Spring 2021

U01 · Fridays, 1:30 - 4:20 PM

Instructors: Jess Rowland

In this course, students will reconsider sound as material through projects exploring physical technologies of sound-making along with listening and viewings of related arts and artists, readings and writings in theories of sound, new media, and phenomenology. This class offers a hybrid experience-an engagement with art-making and seminar, reconsidering our relationship to the body, physical material, and sound embodied in the world.